CHRONOLOGY
18127 February. Charles Dickens born at Portsmouth.
1817His father, John Dickens, posted to Chatham, Kent, as clerk in Naval Pay Office.
1820Accession of King George IV.
1822John Dickens transferred to London.
1824John Dickens arrested for debt and incarcerated in King’s Bench and the Marshalsea. Charles works in Warren’s Blacking Factory. Charles educated at Wellington House Academy.
1827Becomes solicitor’s clerk.
1829Begins journalistic career as court reporter, Doctors Commons.
1830Accession of King William IV.
1831Dickens becomes parliamentary reporter.
1833His first short story, ‘A Dinner at Poplar Walk’, accepted by The Monthly Magazine.
1834Becomes reporter on The Morning Chronicle.
1836Sketches by Boz published. First parts of Pickwick Papers appear. Marries Catherine Hogarth.
1837Accession of Queen Victoria. Pickwick Papers continues. Eldest son Charles born. Moves to 48 Doughty Street.
1838Oliver Twist published. Visits Yorkshire to research for Nicholas Nickleby.
1839Nicholas Nickleby appears. Moves to Devonshire Terrace.
1840Master Humphrey’s Clock, Vol. I.
1841Master Humphrey’s Clock, Vol. II. The Old Curiosity Shop. Barnaby Rudge.
1842The Dickenses tour America. American Notes published.
1843A Christmas Carol. Chronology 303
1844The Chimes. Martin Chuzzlewit.
1845The Cricket on the Hearth. Dickenses return to England after extended visit to Italy.
1846Pictures from Italy.

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Inside Dickens' London
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 6
  • 1 - The Place 13
  • 2 - The People 36
  • 3 - Shops and Shopping 66
  • 4 - City and Clerk 95
  • 5 - Transport and Travel 120
  • 6 - Entertainment 148
  • 7 - The Poor 216
  • 8 - Crime and Punishment 261
  • 9 - The Respectable 296
  • Gazetteer 335
  • Chronology 339
  • Index 341
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