Knowledge in Later Islamic Philosophy: Mullā Ṣadrā on Existence, Intellect, and Intuition

By Ibrahim Kalin | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
Treatise on the Unification of the Intellector
and the Intelligible
(Risālah fī ittiḥād al-’āqil wa’l-ma’qūl)

Muḥammad ibn Ibrahim ibn Yaḥyā al-Qawamī al-Shīrazī

A Note on Translation

The following translation of Mullā Ṣadrā’s treatise entitled Risālah fī ittiḥād al-’āqil wa’l-ma’qūl is based on Ḥāmid Najī Isfahānī’s critical edition published in Majmū’a-yi rasā’il-ifalsafi-yi Ṣadr al-muta’allihin (Tehran, Iran: Intishārāt-i Ḥikmat, AH 1375), pp. 63–103 Nineteen manuscripts of the Risālah have been found in the libraries of Tehran, Qom, Mashhad, Najaf, and Hamadan.1 The editor has used the manuscripts found in the Kitabkhana-yi Markaz-i Danishghah, Kitabkhana-yi Mulk, and the personal libraries of Quddūs Radawī and Āyat Allāh Sayyīd ‘Izz al-Dīn Zanjānī. In paragraphing the translation, I followed the Arabic edition. The page numbers in brackets correspond to Isfahānī’s pagination.

[1] Treatise on the Unification of the Intellector2and the Intellected3

[3] In the Name of God, the Infinitely Good, the All-Merciful

Gratitude is for the Giver of knowledge and wisdom, and benediction is upon the instrument of generosity and compassion, and upon his family of Imams who are the treasury of the secrets of the Shari’ah and religion, and the protectors of the lights of knowledge and certitude.

After that, this [tract] is a magnificent sign from among the signs of God’s wisdom and providence, and a perfect pearl from among the ocean of the jewelry of His generosity and mercy, concerning the critical investigation (tahqiq) of the question of unity between the intellector and the intelligibilia, and the question that the active intellect is all existents (mawjūdāt). These two noble issues are among the most difficult problems of metaphysics so much so that they are like the two eyes and two ears through the power of which the forms of things are seen. Or, they are like two luminous stars by which everything in the world and the heavens is illuminated. Both of these issues have been mentioned in the language of some of the ancients (al-mutaqaddimīn).

-256-

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