Quiet Testimony: A Theory of Witnessing from Nineteenth-Century American Literature

By Shari Goldberg | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would never have found as much quietness as I did without the generosity of professors, colleagues, friends, and family. I am grateful to Paul Kane, who caught me as a freshman at Vassar and taught me to read closely. The English department at the University at Albany is not known for being quiet, but its feistiness made scholarship feel urgent and consequential. I particularly benefitted from the challenging and warm environment fostered by Rick Barney, Bret Benjamin, Helen Elam, James Lilley, and Jennifer Greiman. An earlier version of chapter 3 appeared in Arizona Quarterly 65.2 (2009): 1–26; the editorial comments I received helped me to grow my ideas.

When upstate New York was my home, Jenn Marlow and Tara Needham provided tea, friendship, and smarts in doses that I miss almost daily. Matthew Pangborn and I spent several important hours with Melville one day, and he has been a supportive friend since graduation. In Dallas, the literary studies writing group has engaged with and improved my thoughts and my prose. I owe Lisa Siraganian special thanks for reading and prompting me to clarify many pages of this book. I am also appreciative of Marta Harvell and Mona Kasra, who have kept me close despite my hectic schedule, and Nicole Jacobs, who came to be my neighbor in a summer when I needed one and who is still willing, after many years, to read my work.

I am especially indebted to some of the scholars whom I most admire. Eduardo Cadava was gracious enough to serve on my dissertation committee, and his kindness, patience, and sense of responsibility continue

-vii-

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Quiet Testimony: A Theory of Witnessing from Nineteenth-Century American Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction- Arriving at Quiet 1
  • 1- Emerson- Testimony without Representation 22
  • 2- Douglass- Testimony without Identity 57
  • 3- Melville- Testimony without Voice 87
  • 4- James- Testimony without Life 120
  • Conclusion- Staying Quiet 149
  • Notes 155
  • Bibliography 179
  • Index 191
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