Clean Energy Nation: Freeing America from the Tyranny of Fossil Fuels

By Jerry McNerney; Martin Cheek | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Once before, America stood on the threshold of a renewable-energy revolution. In the late 1970s, wind farms were popping up in California. Companies making solar photovoltaic cells were attracting waves of new capital. Passive solar building designs, ultra-efficient windows, and energy-saving lamps were all very chic. Biofuels had strong supporters in the farm and forestry sectors, and national labs were exploring cellulosic ethanol and diesel fuel from microalgae.

President Carter had declared a goal of obtaining 20 percent of the nation’s energy from renewable sources by the year 2000, and he had installed solar water heaters on the White House. New policies and funding would be needed to achieve the 20 percent goal, and I headed the federal laboratory charged with producing the policy roadmap. For reasons that still remain baffling, the Reagan administration was extremely hostile to renewable-energy sources. It ignored the policy roadmap and systematically crushed the wind, solar, and biofuel programs. President Reagan even ordered that the solar water heaters be ripped off the White House. For the last three decades, the renewableenergy industry has been something of a backwater in America.

Meanwhile, the rest of the world began waking up. Japan started pushing the envelope on solar electricity, and then Germany adopted a feed-in tariff that gave the industry a great shot of adrenaline. Worldwide solar sales have been growing 50 to 60 percent per year for the last decade. Denmark kept expanding the frontiers of wind technology; its innovations are now bearing fruit around the world. Enormous strides have been made in mapping and drilling deep for geothermal resources.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clean Energy Nation: Freeing America from the Tyranny of Fossil Fuels
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.