Enterprise Project Governance: A Guide to the Successful Management of Projects across the Organization

By Paul C. Dinsmore; Luiz Rocha | Go to book overview

Glossary

accountability—The obligation to answer for a responsibility conferred. It is a relationship based on the obligation to demonstrate and take responsibility for performance in light of agreed expectations, whether or not those actions were within your direct control.

alignment—The purposeful development of sound processes, practices, and evolving human relationships that embrace mutual understandings of goals, values, culture, and capabilities that leverage the development of strategies, and that can ultimately facilitate coadaptation to changing situations and the creation of value for the organization. With alignment, a company’s ability to react to increasingly uncertain and dynamic markets is significantly enhanced; companies can define entirely new markets or set the standard of excellence in their industry.

assumptions—Hypotheses regarding the conditions necessary for the realization of strategies over which the organization has no control. Assumptions represent the risks that you may not achieve desired outcomes. Any change to an assumption during the execution cycle should force a revision.

assurance—All the systematic actions necessary to have the confidence that the target (process, program, project, outcome, benefit, capability, product output, deliverable) is appropriate. Assurance must be independent from what is being assured. benefit—The improvement resulting from outcomes perceived and expressed

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