Recruiting, Interviewing, Selecting & Orienting New Employees

By Diane Arthur | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11
Documenting the Interview

One benefit of active listening is that interviewers can take notes while the applicant is talking without losing track of what’s being said. Thanks to thought speed, you can write down key words and ideas during the interview, then, immediately after, develop your notes more fully. Doing this right away will ensure that you retain important facts.


Remember the Role of Documentation in the
Selection Process

Some interviewers believe that note taking will offend applicants or make them uneasy. If you feel this way, tell the applicant at the beginning of the interview that you’ll be taking some notes to make certain you have sufficient information upon which to base an effective evaluation. Most applicants actually prefer that you take notes. After all, there are usually a number of applicants competing for one job; how can the interviewer differentiate among all the applicants without notes? In fact, not taking notes could convey a lack of interest on the part of the interviewer.

Interview notes are a permanent record and should be written with care. Most interviewers favor a separate interview evaluation form over a blank piece of paper. There are numerous variations as to the categories that should appear on an evaluation form and the terminology used to evaluate competencies and the applicant overall. Appendix G represents a basic format that distinguishes between essential tangible requirements, job-related intangible requirements, and additional desirable qualities. Significantly, the form calls for comments about the applicant’s qualifications in relation to each requirement. In addition, interviewers are asked to support their overall evaluation of “strong,” “average,” or “weak” with specific examples drawn from the interview. The form also excludes numerical ratings for each qualification, as well as preset tangible and intangible competencies, recognizing that each job calls for a specific skill set. The form also steers clear of highly subjective terms such as “personality” and “appearance.” If these traits can be shown to be jobrelated, the interviewer can add them under the heading “Job-Related Intangible Requirements.”

Interviewers are cautioned against writing directly on the employment applica-

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Recruiting, Interviewing, Selecting & Orienting New Employees
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.