Interpersonal Negotiations: Breaking Down the Barriers

By Len Leritz | Go to book overview

3
You Get What You Believe

Learning Objectives
By the end of this chapter, you should be able to:
List three ways our beliefs impact our negotiations.
Describe the primary self-limiting and empowering beliefs.
Cite examples for each of the four types of boundary-creating beliefs.
Describe five options for effectively managing self-limiting beliefs in negotiations.

PERCEPTIONS AND BELIEFS

Our perceptions and beliefs go a long way toward determining the results that we get in our negotiations. Our beliefs affect our emotional energy and motivation. They precede everything we do. They determine what we do and don’t do, and they determine how we go about our negotiations. The dialogue in our head often determines the outcomes of our negotiations before we open our mouths.


When We Believe that We Can

When we believe that we have a right to what we want, and when we believe we can be successful in achieving it, then we tend to go after it with a certain amount of gusto and confidence. We feel empowered and we envision how we can achieve our goals.

If we want to negotiate a raise, many factors can affect it: company policies, our performance, length of employment, comparable salaries and where we are in comparison, the current economy, and how well the company is doing. While our attitude is only one of the factors, it is an important one. If

-35-

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Interpersonal Negotiations: Breaking Down the Barriers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About This Course ix
  • How to Take This Course xi
  • 1 - Essentials of Negotiating 1
  • 2 - How to Prepare for a Negotiation 21
  • 3 - You Get What You Believe 35
  • 4 - Identify and Remove the Blocks 57
  • 5 - Dealing with Difficult People 81
  • Bibliography 107
  • The First Examination 109
  • The Practice Case 117
  • The Practice Case Solution 123
  • Cover Sheet - The Examination Case 127
  • Selected Readings 137
  • Index 143
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