Manager 3.0: A Millennial's Guide to Rewriting the Rules of Management

By Brad Karsh; Courtney Templin | Go to book overview

3
FROM INDIVIDUAL
CONTRIBUTOR TO MANAGER

“Millennials have a great opportunity to change the way leaders
lead, from the old school of command and control
to the new school of trust and track.”

Paul Spiegelman, CEO of The Beryl Companies
and author of Why Is Everyone Smiling?

Now in the red corner, we have the millennials at more than 75 million strong; in the blue corner, we have a tag team of Xers and Boomers weighing over 15 billion pounds!

Although it’s not a battle and I’m not pitting people against one another, I oft en see the quick, verbal jabs among the generations. I have worked with tens of thousands of senior leaders across the country, and they express a little—okay, a lot of frustration—with the millennial perspective. As you become a manager, you will begin thinking less about your individual performance and more about the performance of your team. Admittedly, millennial manager Cheryl Ryan was surprised with how difficult this transition was. “It’s a big shift to go from knowing the work to leading the work,” shared Ryan, Director, Human Resources at Centro. “It took several months to feel comfortable delegating and taking a step back. It’s hard to let go and no longer own what you were truly great at.”

To help you make this transition, we’re going to look at what I hear from your elders as being a dichotomy in viewpoints. This review of “millennials vs. older generations” will help you see where some of the struggles come into play as you go from individual contributor to man-

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