A Culture of Everyday Credit: Housekeeping, Pawnbroking, and Governance in Mexico City, 1750-1920

By Marie Eileen Francois | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A decade is a long time, even to write a book about almost a century and a half of Mexican history. I incurred innumerable debts in the process of producing this book and surely will spend decades more repaying them. Many scholars have shaped questions I asked in this project, going back to my college days at Virginia with William Taylor and Joseph Miller, then on to Master’s years in Santa Cruz with David Sweet and Sonia Alvarez. A summer at the Programa Interdisciplinario de Estudios de la Mujer (PIEM) at the Colegio de México and then doctoral training at the University of Arizona with Michael Meyer, Donna Guy, Kevin Gosner, Bert Barickman, Karen Anderson, Nancy Hunt, and Doug Weiner introduced me to historiography and feminist theory, which continue to rattle around in my head. Keeping up with the likes of compañeros Bianca Premo, Michael Brescia, Sharon Bailey-Glasco, Jeff Shumway, Osvaldo Berreneche, Wendy Waters, Helen Wheatley, and Andrew Sessions challenged my intellect. This book would have been impossible without the archival expertise of Juan Rodríguez Buendía, especially in uncovering pawnshop inventories and combing nineteenth-century newspapers for pawning references.

Michael Meyer, Kevin Gosner, and Donna Guy on my dissertation committee, as well as Doug Cope and John Kicza, gave me valuable feedback on my dissertation and helped transform that project into this more ambitious book. María del Pilar Martínez López-Cano, Anne Staples, and Judy Ewell gave me much to think about in editing articles that came out of the project. I cannot thank Donna Guy and Kevin Gosner enough for reading the manuscript on short notice before it went off in search of a publisher. Silvia Arrom and two anonymous readers for the University of Nebraska Press contributed more than they know with their comments. Others who have offered suggestions about conference papers and chapters over the years include Rodney Anderson, Jay Kinsbruner, Edith Couturier, Bill Beezley, Jane Mangan, Jurgen Buchenau, Victor Macías, Katherine Bliss, John Lear, Rob Buffington, Phyllis Smith, and Patience Schell. I have tried to heed all their sage advice, and any blame for inconsistencies or a lack of clarity that remain rest solely with me.

My decade of research took me into numerous archives in Mexico, and I thank the staff at the Archivo de la Nación, Archivo Histórico de la Ciudad

-xi-

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