Army and Empire: British Soldiers on the American Frontier, 1758-1775

By Michael N. McConnell | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Guy, Œconomy and Discipline, 2, 24, 27–28, 74–80, 130. Contemporaries understood the muster to be “a review of the troops under arms, to see if they be complete, and in good order; to take an account of their numbers, the condition they are in, viewing their arms, accoutrements, etc.” Smith, Military Dictionary, 192. Glimpses of Pitcher’s American career can be found in a number of sources, including Pargellis, Military Affairs, 34, 158–59, 201–3, 249–51, 268; Stevens et al., Papers of Henry Bouquet, 1:309; 2:57; 5:604, 624, 814; 6:19, 104–5; Sullivan, Flick, and Hamilton, Papers of William Johnson, 1:435, 670, 693.

2. Pitcher’s assistant commissaries were William Porter and James Stewart (Steward). Both are identified in the returns for 1766 in Returns, 1491.

3. Mileage is derived from account book 4, entry for April 15, 1765, and “Estimates of Expences for Commissary of Musters,” 1766, account book 6, Gage Papers.

4. “Garrison government” comes from Webb, “Army and Empire.”

5. Any consideration of the British army in America must begin with the pathbreaking studies Shy, Toward Lexington, and Frey, British Soldier in America. Notable recent work includes Anderson, A People’s Army, and the same author’s stunning narrative on the Seven Years’ War, Crucible of War; Brumwell, Redcoats, “Rank and File,” “Home from the Wars,” and “ ‘A Service Truly Critical’ ”; Way, “The Cutting Edge of Culture” and “Rebellion of the Regulars.” The literature on the “new military history” is considerable. Keegan’s Face of Battle is perhaps the classic example of this type of work. Discussion of the literature and the meaning of the new military history can be found in Chambers, “The New Military History”; Lynn, “The Embattled Future of Academic Military History”; Shy, “The Cultural Approach to the History of War”; Carp, “Early American Military History”; Higginbothem, “The Early American Way of War.” See also the review essay by Selesky, “Imperial Wars.”


1. British Occupation of the West

1. Sir Jeffrey Amherst to William Pitt, January 7, 1761, Kimball, Correspondence of William Pitt, 1:383; Amherst to Pitt, 27 February, 1761, ibid., 1:404; Rogers, Journals.

-153-

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Army and Empire: British Soldiers on the American Frontier, 1758-1775
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - The British Occupation of the West 1
  • 2 - Frontier Fortresses 32
  • 3 - Military Society on the Frontier 53
  • 4 - The Material Lives of Frontier Soldiers 73
  • 5 - The World of Work 82
  • 6 - Diet and Foodways 100
  • 7 - Physical and Mental Health 114
  • Conclusion 145
  • Notes 153
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 207
  • In the Studies in War, Society, and the Military Series 212
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