When I Was a Child: Children's Interpretations of First Communion

By Susan Ridgely Bales | Go to book overview

notes

INTRODUCTION

1 All names have been changed except those of the most recognizable members of the community: the priests and the catechists.

2 Bryan T. Froehle and Mary L. Gautier, Catholicism USA: A Portrait of the Catholic Church in the United States (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2000), 76.

3 A note on terminology: Throughout the book I try to describe my consultants using their actual nationalities whenever possible; Virginia, for instance, is Mexican, not Hispanic. However, many of the children, who had grown up in the United States, had parents from two different Latin American countries, which made finding a succinct descriptor impossible. These children are designated “Latino.” Whenever possible I use the term “Latino” over “Hispanic” because it includes those of African and Amerindian descent as well as those of Spanish descent. In quoted material and when discussing the work of the Hispanic Ministry, however, I have retained the use of “Hispanic.” Similarly, I generally use the term “white” for Euro-Americans except when I am discussing Latino and Euro-American interaction and “Anglo” seems more appropriate. For more on the use of “Latino,” see Anthony M. Stevens-Arroyo’s introduction to Old Masks, New Faces: Religion and Latino Identities, ed. Anthony M. Stevens-Arroyo and Gilbert R. Cadena, Program for the Analysis of Religion among Latinos no. 2 (New York: Binder Center for Western Hemispheric Studies, 1995), 10–11. The designations “African American” and “Anglo and Latino” refer to the parishes’ identities rather than to their actual ethnic makeup. I will discuss these identities in more detail in Chapter 1.

4 Arnold Van Gennep, Rites of Passage, trans. Monika B. Vizedom and Gabrielle L. Caffee (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1960), 3.

-189-

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