Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns

By Hesiod; Daryl Hine | Go to book overview

WORKS AND DAYS

Come, you Pierian1 Muses, who give us the glory of music,   1
Tell me of Zeus, your progenitor, make praise-songs in his honor;
Through him, moreover, are humankind undistinguished or famous,
They are sung or unsung by the will of omnipotent great Zeus.
Easily making a man strong, easily he overthrows him,   5
Easily humbles the proud as he lifts up high the obscure, and
Easily straightens the crooked as well as deflating the puffed-up—
Zeus, who is deathless and thunders aloft and dwells in the highest.
Listen to me and behold, make straight your decisions with justice.
I would be happy to speak true facts to you, Perses,2 my brother.   10

There is not only one Discord, for on earth she is twofold:
One of them nobody would find fault with on closer acquaintance;
One you would deprecate, for they have totally different natures.
Wickedly, one promotes all the evils of warfare and slaughter;
No one of humankind likes her; out of necessity, at the   15
Will of the blessed immortals, they treat grim Discord with honor.
There is, moreover, another, the firstborn daughter of dark Night.
Her did the high-throned scion of Cronus whose home is in heaven
Place at the roots of the earth; she is certainly better for mankind.
This is that Discord that stirs up even the helpless to hard work,   20

1. From Pieria in Macedonia, one of the many homes of the Muses, like Mount Heli-
Econ and Mount Parnassus, nearer Hesiod’s home.

2. Otherwise unknown. Note on pronunciation: a last or next to last e is sounded, as
Ein Perses and as in many feminine names, such as Phoebe and Hermione.

-23-

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Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Hesiod - Works and Days Theogony 21
  • Works and Days 23
  • Theogony 53
  • The Homeric Hymns - The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice 89
  • Translator’s Note 91
  • The Homeric Hymns 95
  • The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice 197
  • Index 209
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