Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns

By Hesiod; Daryl Hine | Go to book overview

THEOGONY

Let us begin to sing of the Muses of Helicon first, who   1
Have and inhabit their shrine on that large and numinous mountain.
Furthermore, round some spring that is violet-colored, on tender
Feet they are dancing or round the altar of Zeus the almighty,
Bathing their delicate skin in the spring of Permessus or in the   5
Spring of the horse1 or of sacred Olmeius; they often create their
Lovely and beautiful dances on top of Mount Helicon’s summit.
Thence they arise and they go forth wholly enveloped in darkness,
Walking abroad in the night, projecting their beautiful voices,
Singing of Zeus, who sustains the aegis, and reverend Hera,   10
Lady of Argos2—wherever she wanders, her sandals are golden—
Hymning the daughter of Zeus, who carries the aegis, Athena
With gray eyes, and Apollo and Artemis, lover of arrows,
Also Poseidon, who holds the earth and occasionally shakes it,
Reverend Themis3 and coy Aphrodite, who glances askance, too,   15
Beautiful Hebe,4 whose garland is gold and lovely, Dione,5

1. Pegasus, the winged horse from whose hooves many a sacred spring sprang.
ESprings are generally sacred to the Muses, who may originally have been water sprites,
Enymphs, or naiads.

2. Argos, in the Peloponnesus, was sacred to Hera (Zeus’s third wife), as Athens was
Eto Athena, etc. Most cities had their special, tutelary deity.

3. “Justice” or “Steadfast,” Zeus’s second wife; a partial personification, like Hebe
E(Youth).

4. “Youth,” a minor deity; in Homer, the cupbearer of the Gods and heavenly wife of
EHeracles.

5. Mother of Aphrodite in some versions.

-53-

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Works of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Hesiod - Works and Days Theogony 21
  • Works and Days 23
  • Theogony 53
  • The Homeric Hymns - The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice 89
  • Translator’s Note 91
  • The Homeric Hymns 95
  • The Battle of the Frogs and the Mice 197
  • Index 209
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