Notes

Introduction

1. The right to food is probably the most well developed of all ESC rights; hence, the situation is even worse in all other fields of development.

2. See the Center for Human Rights and Conflict Resolution website.

3. Note that my professional experience is almost exclusively in sub-Saharan Africa, which is bound to color my insights. Most important, I am likely to overestimate the impact of aid and foreigners in my writing, as the footprint of the development community is much bigger in African countries than elsewhere.


Chapter 1

1. The General Assembly was then a body of forty-eight states, of which fourteen were Western countries (all in favor), thirty-five third-world countries (thirtythree in favor, including India, Pakistan, Cuba, Egypt, Iran, Iraq; the two that abstained were Saudi Arabia and South Africa), and seven communist countries (all abstained, with the exception of China); two countries were not present to vote.

2. The United States still took twenty-six years to ratify even this covenant and did so with so many reservations and understandings that it substantially nullified its effect. It took until 1998 for China to ratify.


Chapter 2

1. For some excellent discussions, see An-Na’im 1992; Steiner and Alston 2000, part B.

2. Some of the major developing countries such as India, China, Cuba, Lebanon, Panama, Egypt, and the Philippines also played a role in its drafting and voted in favor; see Glendon 2002.

3. Donnelly 1999b, 68; Tatsuo 1999, 31 ff.; Ignatieff 1999. Arjun Sengupta argues that human rights are deeply imbued with the values of free-market systems, but Donnelly adds the important corrective that this is more the European, welfare-state, market system than the one that is prevalent in the United States or Hong Kong.

4. Perhaps the most important author taking such a position is Martha Nussbaum.

5. Nussbaum 1997, 275. For a nice overview of various critiques, see Kennedy 2002.

6. Nussbaum argues that this is so because of the phenomenon of “adaptive preferences”: people at the bottom of society often lower their expectations of life, to the extent of considering their fate normal and deserved, while those who are used to great luxury may deeply resent not having more (Nussbaum 1997).

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Rights and Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Boxes and Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Some Debates of Relevance to the Development Practitioner 7
  • 1 - Background 9
  • 2 - The Legal Challenges 17
  • Part II - Human Rights in the Practice of Development 45
  • 3 - The Basics 47
  • 4 - Political Conditionality 56
  • 5 - Positive Support 83
  • 6 - A Rights-Based Approach to Development 122
  • 7 - Final Synthesis and Questions 167
  • Notes 203
  • Bibliography 211
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 241
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.