One Less Hope: Essays on Twentieth-Century Russian Poets

By Constantin V. Ponomareff | Go to book overview

Conscience in Anna Akhmatova’s Poetic Work

Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
Shakespeare: Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

Odnoy nadezhdoy men’she stalo,
Odnoyu pesney bol’she budet.
(April, 1915)

One less hope becomes
One more song.4
Anna Akhmatova: White Flock


Introduction

In the year that Akhmatova was born, Anton Chekhov published a story he called Pripadok (Paroxism) which, in an autobiographical sense, recreated in the central character Vasil’ev, Chekhov’s own agonized sense of the pain of human existence.

Akhmatova’s poetic work with its affinity for human pain connects her to Chekhov’s writing. Perhaps this is not surprising if one remembers that her close friend Osip Mandelshtam - and with him the critic Viktor Zhirmunsky - believed her poetic work in its complexity and depth to be closer to the psychological sensibility of such nineteenth-century writers as Turgenev, Dostoevsky and Leo Tolstoy. In fact, Mandelshtam believed that Akhmatova owed her very creative existence to these writers rather than to any other poetic forerunners: “‘The genesis of Akhmatova lies in Russian prose, not poetry.’”5 One might agree with this evaluation of Akhmatova’s poetic sensibility, if it did not exclude the poet Alexander Pushkin.

4 The translation is by Judith Hemschemeyer.

5 Quoted in V. M. Zhirmunsky, Tvorchestvo Anny Akhmatovoy (Leningrad, 1973), p. 45.

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
One Less Hope: Essays on Twentieth-Century Russian Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 196

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.