The Executed God: The Way of the Cross in Lockdown America

By Mark Lewis Taylor | Go to book overview

epilogue
Christian Living:
Toward a Fullness of Rebellion

[Rebellion’s] most profound logic is not the logic of destruction; it is the
logic of creation.

—Albert Camus, The Rebel

This book, The Executed God, has abounded with the rhetoric of opposition. Opening with a lament regarding Christendom’s betrayal of faith in the Jesus of Galilee and Golgotha, I moved to a critique of lockdown America as a political theatrics of terror, seeking to show how it serves interests of empire and Pax Americana.

Indeed, the rhetoric of opposition was especially strong when, throughout Part Two, I presented the way of the cross (with its three dimensions of adversarial politics, dramatic action, and organizing movements) as a theatrics that can counter terror. The way of the cross, it may seem, all takes place under the sign of resistance or of a rebellion against lockdown and empire.

Is Christian living thus a complex practice of negation, a nay-saying, only a practice of continually positioning ourselves against things? Does not Christian living entail more than this? What, we might ask in a more positive vein, do Christians live for?

I close this book by responding to these questions. I will not do so, however, by simply identifying some positive traits, some positive sense of the good to arrange on some other side, in order to create balance for an otherwise allegedly negative situation.

No, resistance and rebellion, especially pursued along the way of the cross, reveals its good from within the process of resistance. Resistance is not some evil to be counterposed to the good. Resistance as struggle amid institutionalized evil of our time is a point of suffering that is dialectically related to the good. Resistance, when embraced fully, is a practice of negation that yet expresses, embodies, and gives rise to practices of affirmation and celebration. The good, the positive that is worth celebrating, is not something other than the practice of resistance, not some alternative to the theatrics of counterterror. The good is revealed by exploring the various textures and implications of rebellion, which are entailed in the way of the executed God.

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Executed God: The Way of the Cross in Lockdown America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 209

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.