The Executed God: The Way of the Cross in Lockdown America

By Mark Lewis Taylor | Go to book overview

notes

Preface

1. Christian Parenti, Lockdown America: Police and Prisons in the Age-of Crisis (New York: Verso, 1999).

2. Stephen Donziger, ed., The Real War on Crime: The Report of the National Criminal Justice Commission (New York: Harper Perennial, 1996), 31.

3. Abu-Jamal is a journalist and author who has been confined on Pennsylvania’s death row for nearly twenty years. He languishes there in spite of some of the most impressive and most extensive support ever shown for a confined person in the United States. As I write in the year 2000, he is still sentenced to execution for the 1981 shooting death of a Philadelphia police officer, Daniel Faulkner, even though Amnesty International has issued a formal study calling for a new trial, and both the NAACP and the (ACLU) feature branches that have submitted a special “Memorandum of Law” arguing that Abu-Jamal’s death sentence violates the U.S. Constitution. As is typical of Abu-Jamal’s many writings (three books and over four hundred essays, from which quotations are made throughout this volume), the quotation at the outset of this Preface focuses our attention not upon his own controversial case, important as it is, but onto issues that impact all of us.

4. Martin Hengel, Crucifixion (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1977), 32.

5. For the comparison between transnational empire in the United States and Roman empire, which we will discuss in depth in Chapter 3, see Richard Hardt and Antonio Negri, Empire (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000), 166, 314–16.

6. Karl Barth, Deliverance to the Captives: Sermons and Prayers (New York: SCM, 1961), 76–78.

7. Ibid., 76.

8. John Dominic Crossan, Who Killed Jesus? Exposing the Roots of Anti-Semitism in the Gospel Story of the Death of Jesus (San Francisco: Harper San Francisco, 1996), 133–35; John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus: The Life of a Mediterranean Jewish Peasant (San Francisco: Harper San Francisco, 1993), 171–72; and Hengel, Crucifixion, 49–63, 79.

9. Hengel, Crucifixion, 78.

10. Parenti, Lockdown America, 163–69.

11. For one insider’s account of this brutalization, while working as a prison guard, see Ted Conover, New Jack: Guarding Sing Sing (New York: Random House, 2000).

-164-

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