Living with Dyspraxia: A Guide for Adults with Developmental Dyspraxia

By Mary Colley | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Once known as ‘clumsy child syndrome’, developmental dyspraxia used to be perceived as a disorder from Neverland – a childhood problem that vanishes with age. Even now, the majority of books about dyspraxia focus on primary-schoolaged children and are written specifically for parents and teachers. Living with Dyspraxia is the first book to openly challenge the Neverland myth, a myth that has caused countless adults to enter the world of work with their special needs unrecognised and unmet.

This book is a treasure trove of excellent advice. It includes coping strategies on topics as diverse as cookery, learning to drive, studying at university, and applying for a job. Mary has also done her readers a great favour by acknowledging the significant overlap between dyspraxia, the autistic spectrum and the other specific learning differences. For most people, dyspraxia is much more than a co-ordination disorder a fact that sometimes goes unrecognised.

I have been greatly helped by this book. My own copy is well thumbed and streaked with orange highlighter. Practical, concise, and devoid of self-pity, Living with Dyspraxia fills a gap on the bookshelves that has stood empty for much too long.

Recently I was talking to a 21-year-old woman about her experiences in education. She has a cocktail of learning differences, including dyspraxia, dyslexia, auditory processing difficulties and autism. She was unable to speak until she was nine years old and the true nature of her difficulties was only discovered when she was 19. Now she is at university, studying to become an educational psychologist. Despite the unsympathetic and often downright abusive treatment she received as a child with hidden disabilities, she has retained a hopeful and gentle approach to life – an approach that the people who know her can only wonder at.

-7-

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