Living with Dyspraxia: A Guide for Adults with Developmental Dyspraxia

By Mary Colley | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

This book has been written for those adults who wonder why they find some things in their lives so much harder than other people. It provides a commonsense approach to many of the problems that individuals with co-ordination difficulties face on a day-to-day basis.

The information in the book can give other people some insight into what life with co-ordination difficulties is like. It may give medical professionals, social workers, colleges’ special needs teachers and careers officers ideas for helping adults with the condition. Employers might use the information to assist the adults to integrate into the workplace more fully.

Professionals who work with children now have better understanding of dyspraxia and related conditions. Over the past few years services for this group have started to appear across the UK.

However we sometimes forget that the children grow into adults, and that those adults may still require some help and support to be able to have a fulfilled and happy life. At present there are few opportunities for help for the individuals who have problems. Their difficulties may affect their ability to do certain tasks; and may also impact on their skills to make and maintain relationships. This can have a deleterious effect when trying to get and keep a job, or to meet people and have a successful relationship.

Some adults with co-ordination difficulties feel very despondent and even become depressed. Finding appropriate help can be a long and tiring job. There are few services set up to help the adult who doesn’t fit into the remit of either the mental health services or the learning disability services. For many people it means ‘falling through the gap’ and just accepting whatever help is available in their area, whether or not that help meets their specific needs.

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