Living with Dyspraxia: A Guide for Adults with Developmental Dyspraxia

By Mary Colley | Go to book overview

Appendix 1
CLAIMING BENEFITS

The benefits most commonly claimed by people with dyspraxia are Disability Living Allowance or Disability Working Allowance, and Incapacity Benefit. You may also be able to claim free travel on public transport.

To be eligible for these benefits your dyspraxia would usually have to be moderate to severe.

Your local Citizens Advice Bureau and/or welfare rights or advocacy service can help you, and make all the difference between success and failure to obtain benefits.


Disability Living Allowance

Applications for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) should be supported by a letter from your GP. It is a non-means-tested benefit. If you are working you can get the Disability Working Allowance. It can be awarded for a fixed term or for life. Anybody under 65 may be entitled to claim it. It is also unaffected by other benefits. There are two components to this benefit: the mobility, and the care. It is the care component of this benefit to which dyspraxia-affected adults would be most likely be entitled, at the lowest rate. The care component is based on the ability to cook a main meal. It is therefore a good idea to spell out the tasks you have difficulty with, in a letter. You could set out an example of a main meal and explain that you have difficulty with tasks such as peeling potatoes, boiling water, lifting hot saucepans, and cutting up vegetables and meat. The likelihood of burning the meal or of scalding yourself should also be mentioned.

The mobility component would be more difficult to get, as it depends on experiencing severe difficulty in walking 200–300 yards. However, if you fall over frequently or need a constant companion because you cannot judge distances when crossing a road or get lost easily, you may be entitled to this component.

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