Living with Dyspraxia: A Guide for Adults with Developmental Dyspraxia

By Mary Colley | Go to book overview

INDEX
access to work 116
accuracy, problems with 19
addictive behaviour 20
addresses see information
Adult Sensory Profile 143
adults with dyspraxia case studies 127–136
Alexander Technique 41
AMPS – Assessment of Processing Motor Skills 30, 143
anti-depressants 35
anxiety see stress
alternative therapies see complementary therapies
appearance see clothes, makeup
applications for jobs 112–13
aromatherapy 41
Asperger’s syndrome 15, 126, 149, 162, 163
assertiveness training 59, 60, 98, 104, 124
assessment 25–31, 97
associated conditions 21
asthma 21
Attention Deficit Disorder 15, 23, 149, 162
attention, problems with see concentration, problems with
BADS – Behavioural Assessment of Disexecutive Syndrome 30, 143
balance 17, 30
behaviour 20
behavioural optometrists 31, 32, 35
benefits 6, 25, 32, 137–9
see also grants
bicycles see cycling
birth (giving birth) 30, 57, 58, 146
body, left and right sides 17
books see reading
Brain Gym 45, 46
budgeting 6, 68–9
calendars and diaries 77, 103, 108, 125
career choice 111–12, 114–18
Careers Service 94, 112, 114
cars see driving
checklist for dyspraxia 145–161
childhood
development 7, 17
primitive reflexes theory 36
children, handling 58–9
see also birth
cleaning 78–81, 83, 106, 130
clothes 6, 18, 54, 65–8, 72, 82–4, 89, 113
clumsiness 16–18
‘Clumsy Child Syndrome’ 7, 16, 132
coaching 60
cognitive-behavioural therapy 33
college
choosing the right college/course 93–4
how your college might help you 96–102
Learning Support Centre/Special Needs Department 27, 32, 97, 134
residential courses 95
see also studying
communication
assessment for difficulties with 30
with children 59–60
communicating your dyspraxia 56–7
games to help 54
inappropriate reactions to 54–5
non-verbal communication 34, 51–2
problems and help with 20, 48–59
in relationships 11, 21, 48, 55–6
self-help 59–61
understanding gestures and expressions 31, 41, 43–5, 51–2, 54, 91
in workplace 124
community care 26, 134, 139–40
complementary therapies 36, 40–3

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