The Grateful Dead and Philosophy: Getting High Minded about Love and Haight

By Steven Gimbel | Go to book overview

Saying Thank You for a
Real Good Time

Little did I realize then that all those years, all those miles, and all those boxes of blank cassette tapes were really just research. At the end of this long, strange trip, there are many people to thank for this volume. First and foremost are the authors of these wonderful chapters. They have approached these discussions in the same playful spirit that we celebrate in the Dead’s music, taking themes we’ve heard many, many times before and making them seem fresh, alive, and packed with new insights. One always has to worry about putting Deadheads on a deadline, but their care, craft, and thoughtfulness is appreciated beyond words.

This project could never have become what it is without David Ramsay Steele and George Reisch at Open Court Publishing Company, our Bill Graham and Owsley. Their support, patience, and suggestions have allowed this volume to blossom into what it is.

Special thanks must be extended to Barbara McDonald, Linda Pniak, and everyone connected with the Grateful Dead whom we’ve had the joy and privilege of working with. Bob Weir and Dennis McNally truly went beyond generous with their time, memories, and insight. Their genuine kindness and grace in entertaining our odd, convoluted, and perhaps uncomfortable questions is an embodiment of the spirit that this volume tries to capture. We would like to thank Phil Lesh for reading the manuscript while it was in production. We are especially grateful to Alan Trist from Ice Nine Publishing and his kind help securing the permission to quote from the lyrics throughout the chapters and Sean McGraw of Spirit Two music for his helpfulness with John Phillips’s “Me and My Uncle.”

-xiii-

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