Creatures in the Mist: Little People, Wild Men and Spirit Beings around the World: A Study in Comparative Mythology

By Gary R. Varner | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book could not have been written without the people who have been recording folklore around the world for the last two centuries. Lewis Spence, Alexander Porteous, Lady Wilde, Anne Ross, James Mooney, Joseph Campbell, Mircea Eliade, John Gregorson Campbell, Donald A. Mackenzie, Sir James Frazer, H.R. Ellis Davidson, Carl Jung and Jyoti Sahi are just a few of those scholars, living and dead, that have offered so much to the study of the rituals and beliefs of human beings around the world and throughout time. I offer my thanks and gratitude for their work.

Thanks to Dr. Brian Siegel, Anthropologist, Sociology Department at Furman University, Greenville, South Carolina for permission to quote from his paper “Water Spirits and Mermaids: The Copperbelt Case.”1 Thanks also to David Catherine, formerly of the University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa for his assistance in providing materials on the indigenous traditions of the people of South Africa in regards to water spirits and water in general.

The line drawing illustrations that appear in this book are in the public domain. The Wild Man appearing in Chapter 7 is taken from The Sports and Pastimes of the English People by Joseph Strutt, published 1801. The drawings of the mermaid, the Snake People of Hell and the illustration on the title page are taken from Adventures of Telemachus, published by D. Appleton & Company, New York, ca. 1889. The other line drawings are from The Complete Encyclopedia of Illustration by J. G. Heck, published by Gramercy Books, New York, 1979. This is a reproduction of two of the four volumes of The Iconographic Encyclopaedia of Science, Literature, and Art published in 1851 by R. Garrigue, New York. The photographs of the Native American snake petroglyph in Arizona, the antlered-man pub sign in Ashland, Oregon, the bat carving on the Chester Cathedral in Chester, England, the Harpy that resides in the British Museum and the photo of Bast were taken by the author.

Gary R. Varner California

1 A paper given at the Spring 2000 Southeastern Regional Seminar in African Studies (SERSAS), Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, North Carolina on April 14 & 15, 2000.

-ix-

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