Ogimaag: Anishinaabeg Leadership, 1760-1845

By Cary Miller | Go to book overview

3
Mayosewininiwag
MILITARY LEADERS

It does not devolve upon any chief in particular to make or form
a war party, but any of the braves can muster together a band of
volunteers. Those who have a desire to do so, can join these parties,
the number of each party being regulated entirely according to the
bravery of the individual who forms it
.—George Copway

We have already taken life for life, and it is all our customs require.
Father, do not think that I do not love our people whose blood has
been shed. I would fain kill every one of the … Dakota tribe to
revenge them, but a wise man should be prudent in his revenge
.
—Ezhkibagikoonzh

The presence and assistance of the manidoog infused Anishinaabeg leadership and drew people to follow those whose beneficial decisions reflected extensive support from these very important and very revered spiritual kin. While the support of these beings was important for ogimaag, it was crucial for leaders like mayosewininiwag and gechi-midewijig whose authority rested on the ability to gain followers through demonstrated success and persuasion. Ritual demonstrations of connection to manidoog assistance through song and dance bolstered their ability to inspire others to action. In other words, these leaders were charismatic.

Max Weber defines charisma as “a certain quality of an individual personality by virtue of which he is set apart from ordinary men and treated as endowed with supernatural, super

-113-

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Ogimaag: Anishinaabeg Leadership, 1760-1845
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Power in the Anishinaabeg World 21
  • 2 - Ogimaag Hereditary Leaders 65
  • 3 - Mayosewininiwag Military Leaders 113
  • 4 - Gechi-Midewijig Midewiwin Leaders 147
  • 5 - The Contest for Chiefly Authority at Fond Du Lac 183
  • Conclusion 227
  • Notes 237
  • Glossary 275
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 295
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