Ogimaag: Anishinaabeg Leadership, 1760-1845

By Cary Miller | Go to book overview

Conclusion

The Anishinaabeg of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries lived in a universe suffused with powerful manidoog that positively or negatively affected their daily lives at all levels, from subsistence to warfare to courting to politics. These manidoog became incorporated into Anishinaabeg lives through webs of reciprocal social relationships that extended the notion of kin far beyond biological relatives. They brought needed gifts or blessings to help Anishinaabeg people survive and reinforced the close relationship between the Anishinaabeg and the natural world around them that provided more than simple subsistence. These basic components of Ojibwe world view are fundamental to understanding where Anishinaabeg believed power lay and the nature of the leadership structures these sources of power supported. Although all members of society formed relationships with manidoog that helped their families, exceptionally strong connections enhanced an individual’s influence and personal standing within the community. Access to manidoog assistance, while it seldom allowed gifted individuals to usurp the positions of ogimaag, augmented hereditary authority and sometimes even allowed ogimaag to expand their influence beyond the borders of their home communities.

Anishinaabeg peoples felt a constant need for communication with and assistance from manidoog in everyday life expressed through song, dance, tobacco, feasting, fasting, and dreams. Societal expectations demonstrated this from birth when the parents of a newborn selected someone from among the elders of the community to learn the name of the child. Nicollet reported

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Ogimaag: Anishinaabeg Leadership, 1760-1845
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Power in the Anishinaabeg World 21
  • 2 - Ogimaag Hereditary Leaders 65
  • 3 - Mayosewininiwag Military Leaders 113
  • 4 - Gechi-Midewijig Midewiwin Leaders 147
  • 5 - The Contest for Chiefly Authority at Fond Du Lac 183
  • Conclusion 227
  • Notes 237
  • Glossary 275
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 295
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