Ogimaag: Anishinaabeg Leadership, 1760-1845

By Cary Miller | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. Nichols, “Red Gentlemen and White Savages,” 34.

2. Anishinaabe (plural, Anishinaabeg) is the Indigenous name for the peoples of the Three Fires Confederacy of the western Great Lakes. This confederacy consisted of the Ojibwe (also known as Chippewa, Missisauga, Saulteurs, and Nipissings), the Bodewatomi (Potawatomi), and Odawa (Ottowa). Throughout this work I use Anishinaabe and Anishinaabeg to refer to customs, traditions, and practices common to all three of these groups, and Ojibwe to refer to those that are common only to that group within the confederacy. All Ojibwe language terms used in this text use the double-vowel orthography standard in Ojibwe scholarly literature. The western dialect is used as many of the historical examples are from Minnesota and western Wisconsin. Special thanks to Anton Treuer for his help to transition various spellings in the original sources to the doublevowel system.

3. For a discussion of the social (as opposed to economic) context of gifts, see Murray, Indian Giving, 33–39. Anthropologist Marcel Mauss recognized that exchanges converting the outsider from potential enemy to friend must be examined as part of a dynamic whole; Pierre Bourdieu expanded the concept of economy to include symbolic as well as material value; Johnathan Parry suggested that only with the market do economic relations become differentiated from other types of social relationship; and C. A. Gregory proposed that gift exchange in pre-capitalist societies establishes a relationship between the partners (not between the objects exchanged). In a gift-oriented economy the goal is to expand social relations, and social relationships affirmed represent the true value of the exchange. The world view of the Anishinaabeg made this concept manifest.

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Ogimaag: Anishinaabeg Leadership, 1760-1845
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Power in the Anishinaabeg World 21
  • 2 - Ogimaag Hereditary Leaders 65
  • 3 - Mayosewininiwag Military Leaders 113
  • 4 - Gechi-Midewijig Midewiwin Leaders 147
  • 5 - The Contest for Chiefly Authority at Fond Du Lac 183
  • Conclusion 227
  • Notes 237
  • Glossary 275
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 295
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