A Japanese Memoir of Sumatra, 1945-1946: Love and Hatred in the Liberation War

By Takao Fusayama | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIXTEEN
LEAVING MEDAN

RESIGNATION FROM THE LIAISON OFFICE

One and a half months had passed since I took the job in the liaison office on December 1, 1945. The general situation had completely reversed itself during this period. The anti-Japanese trend in north Sumatra, which we had been so anxious about, had now completely ceased, and the mood of the Indonesian people had turned incredibly pro-Japanese. The Japanese, who had suffered all sorts of pain since surrendering, could now enjoy a safe life again, respected by the Indonesian people just like before the war ended. Consequently, I reported to my regiment commander that I had finished my duties of reestablishing friendship with the Indonesians by settling the Belawan affair, and asked him to advise the division commander to permit my resignation from the liaison office. I could thus return to my original company where my subordinates had missed me for one and a half months.

Dear Medan, I could hardly contain myself over my feelings of attachment to the work at the liaison office, which, though frightening, was worth the effort. However, in such work, the time to stop is very critical. If I were to continue, I would not know what would happen to me in the future. My current actions were thwarting NICA’s strategies. If I were to continue for too long, there was a good possibility that I would be arrested and accused of war crimes by the Dutch. In a one-sided criminal trial, who could know by what distorted logic I could be convicted. Sensing the danger, I therefore sought a good opportunity to retire and I asked my regiment commander to withdraw me from my post. He kindly asked the division commander to permit me to withdraw, stressing that his regiment was keenly missing me as an important company commander

-193-

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