World of Faith and Freedom: Why International Religious Liberty Is Vital to American National Security

By Thomas F. Farr | Go to book overview

1
Confounded by Faith

The consistent need to find explanations other than religious ones for
the [9/11] attacks says, in fact, more about the West than it does about
the jihadis. Western scholars have generally failed to take religion seri-
ously. Secularists, whether liberals or socialists, grant true explanatory
power to political, social, or economic factors but discount the plain
sense of religious statements made by the jihadis themselves.

—Mary Habeck, Knowing the Enemy1

I want my lawyer, tailor, valets, even my wife, to believe in God. I think
that if they do I shall be robbed less and cheated less.

—Voltaire2

“Sociology.”

With that damning label the CIA had dismissed the only intelligence analysis of Iran during the 1970s that discerned a religious basis for the opposition brewing against the American-backed Shah. The word was, according to one scholar of international affairs, “used in intelligence circles to mean the time-wasting study of factors deemed politically irrelevant.” By contrast, most credible attempts to explain Iranian social and political ferment were securely grounded in a secularist world view: the unrest was caused by political opposition to tyranny, the economic dislocation of the newly urbanized, the social resentment of the traditional merchant class, or some combination of such factors. Religion, if it had a role at all, was seen to be marginal or reactionary. Reports indicated a distinction between “pious” and “modern” Iranians, the former inevitably in decline, the latter moving with the tide of history toward triumph.3

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
World of Faith and Freedom: Why International Religious Liberty Is Vital to American National Security
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 367

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.