Water Is Thicker Than Blood: An Augustinian Theology of Marriage and Singleness

By Jana Marguerite Bennett | Go to book overview

3
Marriage in Creation, Fall, and Redemption

Against Gendered Dichotomies

In contemporary theology, the connection between creation, the fall, and marriage is quite strong. Most theologians and ethicists recognize the importance of the Genesis texts for theologically understanding marriage and family. Therein lies the struggle, however, because attention to the Genesis texts necessitates grappling with male and female gender roles (Adam as the lord over Eve) and issues about procreation (the injunction to “be fruitful and multiply”). Immediately, gender and sex and gendered roles become central issues, and thus my considerations in this chapter will help in thinking about gendered dichotomies discussed in chapter 1.

A tendency in feminist theory in the past few decades has been, ironically, to perpetuate its own series of dichotomous thoughts: constructivist/essentialist; sex/gender; nature/nurture; natural body/ constructed body. This is ironic because many scholars have wanted to seek ways beyond the problematic dichotomies they saw in traditional male/female conceptions of the world. Augustine of Hippo helps here, perhaps unexpectedly. On my reading, Augustine’s focus is the nature of relationships between men and women, and how those relationships are about being in friendship with and following God. Dichotomous thinking, both male/female and constructivist/essentialist, makes little sense on Augustine’s worldview, because male/ female cannot be intelligibly separated from each other, and because human sex/gender is to some extent “essential” in that God has created it, but it is also “constructed” in that it can become a new

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Water Is Thicker Than Blood: An Augustinian Theology of Marriage and Singleness
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 243

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.