Water Is Thicker Than Blood: An Augustinian Theology of Marriage and Singleness

By Jana Marguerite Bennett | Go to book overview

4
Neither Married nor Given
in Marriage

Singleness and Salvation History

What I suggested in the previous chapter is that marriage has been part of the story of God’s working in humanity since our creation. Marriage is not limited to creation but figures significantly in other parts of salvation history, and hence in God’s gracious action in our lives. By means of marriage and procreation, we learn to be in relationship with God and with each other; here there are obvious links to the great commandments to love God and neighbor. However, the picture of Christian households is incomplete if we do not consider singleness, partly because considering singleness is recognition that households do not bear identical character to each other; the baptized are not all married with children, nor does it appear that marriage and family should be the main emphasis for Christians.1 We theologians and ethicists cannot rightly understand marriage and family without trying to understanding singleness as well. The reason is because we all are bound together in the one Household of God, and that has bearing on our many households, and it is this connection that I shall demonstrate in the present chapter.

Singleness as a concept shows us some of the diversity that households can take, and it prevents us from having too restricted a view of households. At the same time, considering singleness makes us realize the importance and singularity of God’s grace, as well as the importance of cultivating a life of virtue. Studying states of singleness therefore impacts greatly on both theology and metaethics, especially when viewed from Augustine’s vantage point.

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Water Is Thicker Than Blood: An Augustinian Theology of Marriage and Singleness
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 243

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.