A Commentary on Demosthenes's Philippic I: With Rhetorical Analyses of Philippics II and III

By Cecil Wooten | Go to book overview

Preface

The most recent commentary in English on Demosthenes’ Philippics appeared in 1907; it has been out of print since the 1960s. In part because of the lack of a modern commentary, what are arguably the finest deliberative speeches from antiquity are not often read these days in American colleges and universities. I hope that the present volume will correct that lack and will encourage more study of Demosthenes. The commentary is aimed at advanced undergraduates and first-year graduate students, and it addresses rhetorical and stylistic matters, historical background, and grammatical issues. In the rhetorical analysis I rely primarily on the theories of ancient rhetoricians, especially Hermogenes, who was particularly interested in Demosthenes. I have prepared a commentary for the First Philippic only; for each of the other two speeches I have provided a brief historical introduction, an outline, and an essay emphasizing its differences from Philippic I. I have organized the book in this way because it seemed to me that in some courses only one of the speeches, most likely the first, would be read. If students, having already been introduced to Demosthenic language and rhetorical technique and the historical background, then wanted to read the second and third Philippics, they could, I felt, manage on their own if provided with some general guidance about structure, argument, and style.

I have chosen not to treat Philippic IV. There has always been some controversy about its authenticity, and, in any case, a very thorough commentary appeared in 2002: István Hajdu, Kommentar zur 4. Philippischen Rede des Demosthenes (Berlin).

I would like to thank many friends who have unfailingly given me support, encouragement, and sustenance of various sorts during the last few years as I worked on this project: Francis and Helen Barlow, Niko Endres, Allan Gurganus, Jane Holding, Sharon James, Sara Mack, Harriet Horwitz and Rick Meyer, and Daisy Thorp. I would also like to thank Galen Rowe, now deceased, who read my first analysis of Philippic I, and in particular Bill Race, who encouraged me from beginning to end, meticulously read many versions of the manuscript, and gave me many invaluable suggestions. Everyone should be so lucky to have such a good colleague and friend. Finally, I want to express my gratitude to Victor Bers and Harvey Yunis, who, like the mythical heroes who made two trips to the underworld, read the manuscript not once but twice and gave me many useful suggestions, to the members of the Publications Committee of the American Philological Association, in particular to the chairman of that committee, Justina

-vii-

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A Commentary on Demosthenes's Philippic I: With Rhetorical Analyses of Philippics II and III
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations and Bibliography xi
  • Introduction- Philippic I 3
  • Structure of the Speech 17
  • ΔHmoΣΘEnoyΣ Kata ΦiΛiΠΠoy A' 19
  • Commentary 37
  • Appendix 1- Philippic II 123
  • Appendix 2- Philippic III 137
  • Appendix 3- The Longer and Shorter Versions of Philippic III 167
  • Historical Index 175
  • Rhetorical Index 177
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