A Commentary on Demosthenes's Philippic I: With Rhetorical Analyses of Philippics II and III

By Cecil Wooten | Go to book overview

Structure of the Speech
I. Proemium: D explains why he has risen to speak before the older orators and asks for the audience’s indulgence (§1).
II. Preliminary Arguments (§§2–12).
A. First Topic: The Athenians should not be discouraged by the difficult situation, since they have done nothing to make it better, but should be encouraged by the examples of their ancestors and of Philip himself, who overcame formidable foes by taking vigorous action (§§2–7).
B. Second Topic: Philip’s position is not as sure as it seems, since his allies and subjects resent his arrogance; the Athenians should take advantage of their animosity toward him (§§8–9).
C. Third Topic: Philip has grown great only because of Athenian negligence and carelessness; they will never be able to defeat him if they are unorganized and unprepared (§§10–12).
III. Specific Proposals (§§13–30).
A. Partition: D outlines the subjects that he will discuss and requests a fair hearing (§§13–15).
B. First Proposal: The Athenians must equip fifty triremes and enough ships to transport half the cavalry, so that Philip will know that they are prepared to act (§§16–18).
C. Second Proposal: They need to station a standing force in the north to harass Philip; D discusses the nature of this force (§§19–22).
D. D explains the reasons for the size and composition of the force that he has proposed (§§23–27).
E. D gives an estimate of expenses and discusses the source of funds (§§28–29).
F. D concludes the part of the speech about specific proposals (§30).
IV. Resumption of General Argument (§§31–50).
A. First Topic: Geographical and climatic considerations make a standing force in the north attractive (§§31–32).
B. Second Topic: The general in charge will decide how exactly the force is to be deployed, but this force will deprive Philip of his ability to harass Athenian shipping and possessions and thus of a major source of revenue (§§33–34).

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A Commentary on Demosthenes's Philippic I: With Rhetorical Analyses of Philippics II and III
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations and Bibliography xi
  • Introduction- Philippic I 3
  • Structure of the Speech 17
  • ΔHmoΣΘEnoyΣ Kata ΦiΛiΠΠoy A' 19
  • Commentary 37
  • Appendix 1- Philippic II 123
  • Appendix 2- Philippic III 137
  • Appendix 3- The Longer and Shorter Versions of Philippic III 167
  • Historical Index 175
  • Rhetorical Index 177
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