A Commentary on Demosthenes's Philippic I: With Rhetorical Analyses of Philippics II and III

By Cecil Wooten | Go to book overview

Appendix 3: The Longer and Shorter
Versions of Philippic III

Quite a few passages of Philippic III do not appear in manuscript S, the oldest medieval manuscript of D, dating from the end of the ninth or the beginning of the tenth century and the principal one used in all editions since Bekker’s 1823 Oxford text.1 These passages were added by a later hand in the margins and appear in other manuscripts, not derived from S. This produces what have been called the “longer” and “shorter” versions of the speech, and it is usually assumed that these derive from the delivered version, circulated soon after delivery, and an edited version published months or even years later, although there is disagreement over which is which.

Raphael Sealey, drawing on earlier arguments of M. P. Treves, argued that the longer version was the delivered version of the speech, published soon after its delivery. The shorter version, he felt, was published about two years later as a pamphlet, mainly for dissemination throughout Greece. The basis for this argument is that many of the passages in the longer version that are omitted in the shorter version would have appealed exclusively to an Athenian audience.2

This is an attractive argument. The Third Philippic is addressed to the Athenians, but it is also directed at a larger pan-Hellenic audience (see appendix 2), which would not have been able to hear the speech when it was delivered and could have had access to it only if it had been circulated after its delivery in Athens.3 Moreover, as one would expect, if Sealey’s argument is right, and I think that it is, the passages that are omitted in the shorter version often exhibit

1 Cf. the preface to Dilts’s edition, xvi. These passages are found in sections 2, 6–7, 26, 32, 39, 41–42, 44, 46, 58, and 71. Dilts, as Butcher had done, indicates the passages that are in the longer version but not in the shorter one by printing them in smaller type. He considers sections 6 and 7, however, the longest passage in question, to have been accidentally omitted from S and thus does not print them in smaller type, unlike Butcher’s earlier edition and most other modern editions of the text.

2 “Dionysius of Halicarnassus and Some Demosthenic Dates,” Revue des Ètudes Grecques 68 (1955): 101–4.

3 This is, as far as I know, the only instance of a Demosthenic speech for which two copies were circulated. The Third Philippic, however, because of its double audience, is unique in the corpus of D. That D’s speeches were circulated is indicated by the story in Plutarch (Dem. 11.4) that D’s contemporary Aesion said that he had read them and also by the story in pseudo-Plutarch (Lives of the Ten Orators 845C) that when Philip read copies of the Philippics he said that if he had heard them delivered he would have voted for war against himself.

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Commentary on Demosthenes's Philippic I: With Rhetorical Analyses of Philippics II and III
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations and Bibliography xi
  • Introduction- Philippic I 3
  • Structure of the Speech 17
  • ΔHmoΣΘEnoyΣ Kata ΦiΛiΠΠoy A' 19
  • Commentary 37
  • Appendix 1- Philippic II 123
  • Appendix 2- Philippic III 137
  • Appendix 3- The Longer and Shorter Versions of Philippic III 167
  • Historical Index 175
  • Rhetorical Index 177
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 179

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.