Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension

By Andy Clark | Go to book overview

5
Mind Re-bound?

5.1 EXTENDED Anxiety

The physical mechanisms of mind, EXTENDED suggests, are simply not all in the head. Is this correct? To raise this question is not necessarily to doubt that heterogeneous mixes of neural, bodily, and environmental elements support much human problem-solving behavior or that understanding such coalitions matters for understanding human thought and reason. It is certainly important, for example, that we appreciate and learn how to analyze the role of epistemic actions in Tetris, of deictic pointers in visual problem solving, and even perhaps of Otto’s notebook in his decision making. But should we really count such actions and loops through nonbiological structure as genuine aspects of extended cognitive processes? In this chapter, I consider a range of worries whose starting points concern real or apparent differences between what the brain accomplishes and what the other elements in such problem-solving matrices provide.


5.2 Pencil Me In

Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers (2001, in press-a, in press-b), seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Philosophy of Mind ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Contents xxi
  • Introduction - Brainbound versus Extended xxv
  • I - From Embodiment to Cognitive Extension 1
  • 1 - The Active Body 3
  • 2 - The Negotiable Body 30
  • 3 - Material Symbols 44
  • 4 - World, Incorporated 61
  • II - Boundary Disputes 83
  • 5 - Mind Re-Bound? 85
  • 6 - The Cure for Cognitive Hiccups (Hemc, Hec, Hemc …) 111
  • 7 - Rediscovering the Brain 140
  • III - The Limits of Embodiment 167
  • 8 - Painting, Planning, and Perceiving 169
  • 9 - Disentangling Embodiment 196
  • 10 - Conclusions- Mind as Mashup 218
  • Appendix- The Extended Mind 220
  • Notes 233
  • References 255
  • Index 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.