The Drama of Ideas: Platonic Provocations in Theater and Philosophy

By Martin Puchner | Go to book overview

Epilogue
Dramatic Platonism

In this book, the concept of dramatic Platonism has served a number of historical and analytical purposes. In chapter 1, it provided the lens though which to focus on Plato’s use of drama. In chapter 2, it functioned as a tool for excavating the mostly forgotten tradition of the Socrates play. In chapter 3, it worked as a frame through which to explain the radical innovations of modern drama. In chapter 4, it directed our attention to the “dramatic turn” and “theatrical turn” of philosophy, identifying the reentry of drama and theater into the history of philosophy. And in chapter 5, it connected this dramatic and theatrical philosophy back to Plato by attending to contemporary Platonists with an interest in drama. Taken together, these chapters have sought to supply a new perspective on the histories of theater and philosophy, allowing us to see familiar figures in a new light, but also helping us to locate new objects, new connections, and a new question (what is the relation between philosophy and drama?), as well as a new problem (how to integrate drama and philosophy?). By way of a conclusion, I will outline, in a schematic manner, some of the theoretical consequences of dramatic Platonism for contemporary thought.


Corporealism

The twentieth century witnessed an extraordinary flourishing of writing about the body, an interest that reached its climax in the last decades of the twentieth century across different fields in the humanities. Foucault’s interest in the disciplined body, Deleuze’s fascination with what Artaud called the body without organs, the wide-ranging interest in corporeal practices within gender and sexuality studies—these are some of the more recent manifestations of a wider phenomenon I call corporealism. The three-volume series called Fragments for a History of the Human Body, published by Zone Books, might be seen as one of its most characteristic

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The Drama of Ideas: Platonic Provocations in Theater and Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - The Poetics of the Platonic Dialogue 3
  • 2 - A Brief History of the Socrates Play 37
  • 3 - The Drama of Ideas 73
  • 4 - Dramatic Philosophy 121
  • 5 - The New Platonists 173
  • Epilogue - Dramatic Platonism 193
  • Appendix 1 - Socrates Titles 199
  • Appendix 2 - Charting the Socrates Play 209
  • Notes 211
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 245
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