Blowout! Sal Castro and the Chicano Struggle for Educational Justice

By Sal Castro; Mario T. García | Go to book overview

SIX
Blowout Part I

“We need to do something dramatic like Watts,” I thought to myself following the riots in Los Angeles. I, of course, didn’t support violence, but Watts showed me that only when minorities rebel or publicly resist in such a way to bring attention to their grievances would the rest of society listen. The problem affecting Mexicans in the L.A. schools was so severe and so damaging to our kids that some kind of explosion was needed. I didn’t know what this would mean. All I knew was that without some kind of mass protest by the students nothing would change.

It was about this time that my father paid one of his rare visits from Mazatlán. I had not been very close to him over the years, but he was, after all, my father. One day, during his visit, I told him about all of the problems in the schools and how frustrated I was and how I felt this weight on my shoulders to do something about it. But what?

Huelga,” he calmly said to me. “Huelga.”

“What do you mean, huelga? You mean a strike?”

“M’hijo [son], you know that after I went to Mazatlán, I helped to organize the railroad workers. You know that I was thrown in jail for this. But it was only by striking that the workers got changes for themselves. That’s the only power that poor people have, to organize and go on strike.”

Huelga, strike?” I later thought about what my father had said. “But how would this work with the kids? They’re not going to strike. What do they do? They go to school and don’t leave or not come to school? How do we work this?”


The Chicano Movement

All this started me thinking about a plan of action, a strategy that could successfully be applied to the schools. I knew for sure that a mass action was needed—something like a strike—but the actual plan was something I started formulating in my mind for the next couple of years. In the meantime, things were happening in the Chicano community that in different

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Blowout! Sal Castro and the Chicano Struggle for Educational Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - The Sal Castro Story 1
  • Sal Castro an Oral History 25
  • One - Born in East L.a 27
  • Two - Veterano 56
  • Three - Viva Kennedy 74
  • Four - Mr. Castro 86
  • Five - The Mexican Schools 110
  • Six - Blowout Part I 133
  • Seven - Blowout Part II 172
  • Eight - The East L.a. 13 194
  • Nine - Reprisals and Struggles 221
  • Ten - All My Children 250
  • Eleven - Education Today and Legacies 280
  • Epilogue - The Camp Hess Kramer Spirit 303
  • Afterword - Pedagogy of Chicano Power Sal Castro, Paulo Freire, and the Mexican American Youth Leadership Conferences, 1963–1968 307
  • Appendix Chicano Movement Historiography 325
  • Notes 333
  • Index 363
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 367

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.