Catalan Women Writers and Artists: Revisionist Views from a Feminist Space

By Kathryn A. Everly | Go to book overview

Introduction:
Metaphorical Exile in Catalan
Art and Literature

La dona, per a mi, és l’estimuladora màxima, la portadora i rev-
eladora de la meva part fosca. [Women, for me, are the ultimate
stimulus, the bearer and revealer of my dark side.]

—Federico Fellini

Gender is the repeated stylization of the body, a set of repeated
acts within a highly rigid regulatory frame that congeal over
time to produce the appearance of substance, of a natural sort
of being.

—Judith Butler

It’s hard being a woman. It’s like being a female impersonator
every day.

—Rita Rudner

THE CONCEPT OF POLITICAL OR EMOTIONAL EXILE WITH ITS TIES TO estrangement and dislocation has proved a provocative theme in peninsular letters. From the heroics of the exiled Cid to the inner confabulations of grandeur and chivalry of perhaps the most famous literary Spaniard, Don Quijote, the estrangement from country and self allows for a fresh vision of the nation, of creativity and of individual identity. Unamuno’s exile to the island of Fuerteventura in 1924 led him to voluntarily continue his exiled status in Paris. His experience inspired him to write De Fuerteventura a París: Diario íntimo de confinamiento y destierro vertido en sonetos [From Fuerteventura to Paris: an Intimate Diary of Confinement and Exile Poured into Sonnets] and expresses a need for the artist to articulate and share this ambiguous state of being and nonbeing. Later in the twentieth century Juan Goytisolo, perhaps the most avid writer about the experience of internal exile, chal-

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