Catalan Women Writers and Artists: Revisionist Views from a Feminist Space

By Kathryn A. Everly | Go to book overview

3
Authorial Exile: Reformulations of the
Author/Reader Contract in the
Narrative of Carme Riera

¿Cómo comenzamos a narrar? ¿Cuándo sentimos la necesidad
de vernos narrados? [How do we begin to narrate? When we
feel the need to see ourselves narrated?]

—Montserrat Roig

Los seres humanos no somos más que impura memoria y vaci-
lante voz. [Human beings are nothing more than impure mem-
ory and fluctuating voice.]

—Luisa Cotoner

AS A CONTEMPORARY OF MONTSERRAT ROIG, CARME RIERA ALSO DELVES into textual questions regarding female subjectivity. However, Riera steps outside of the privileged authorial role, in an act like that of Roig of self-imposed exile, in order to manipulate and bend the historically fixed author-reader relationship. This act of voluntary separation comes from an ideological stance that not only forces Riera outside of dominant discourse but also allows her to express a depoliticized view of literary history. Riera takes on readerly expectations by reformulating the traditional epistolary genre in her texts; therefore her project lies in the reevaluation of the act of reading itself. she proclaims herself a feminist yet her writing extends beyond the social boundaries of the political and enters into the unstable, provocative arena of language, meaning, and text.

In her short novel Qüestió d’amor propi [A Matter of Self-Respect], Carme Riera creates a character, Angela, who locates her own epistolary within a larger historical framework when she says: “El text no és més que un pretext amorós”1 [Text is nothing other

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