Intimate Music: A History of the Idea of Chamber Music

By Neil Minturn; Micheal J. Budds | Go to book overview

FOREWORD
From the Series Editor

The College Music Society can boast of a proud tradition of contributions to the study of American music with its series Monographs and Bibliographies in American Music. For many years, volumes disseminated under this banner were rather lavishly produced and fell into the category of reference works, the majority of which were devoted to individual—and sometimes neglected—musical figures. In more recent times, the Society has determined to intensify its efforts by considering a greater range of topics and formats and by making available publications in paperback editions at reasonable prices.

In this spirit and in cooperation with Pendragon Press of Hillsdale, New York, The College Music Society has initiated a correlative series titled CMS Sourcebooks in American Music. The new venture was conceived to underscore the remarkable diversity in our nation’s musical expression and to call special attention to both landmark and representative achievements in its evolution. Whether the subject is a concert or stage work communicated through a notated score, a virtual performance frozen in time by modern technology (such as a film score or a recording), or some other mode of preservation not yet invented or standardized, the goal is the same: to gather materials for study, to reconsider and synthesize existing commentary and criticism, and to offer a fresh assessment or appreciation. Although a canonizing tendency is implicit in any selection process, every attempt has been made to address as many strands in the fabric of American music as possible.

These texts should not be perceived as ends in themselves, moreover, but as educational resources directed to teachers of music, students of music, and other lovers of music. Each author has been advised to take the benefit of primary sources of various kinds as well as the generous body of relevant scholarship and to place his or her subject in contexts most meaningful to contemporary readers. Although there is no intent to provide scholastic tracts of the most exacting rigor, these studies have been carefully and engagingly written and fully documented. Whenever possible, a compact disc featuring performances of historical importance has been attached to the volume as both an added value and a convenience.

It is always prudent to question the feasibility of yet another series of music publications. This is so especially now—when the fruits of the “Information Age” overwhelm the most curious, voracious, or dedicated reader and when the capacity and immediacy of the Internet challenge

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