Intimate Music: A History of the Idea of Chamber Music

By Neil Minturn; Micheal J. Budds | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Documentary Film: Visibility vs. Invisibility
and Technology

To tell the truth, I am a little perplexed about John the Baptist
and his portraits. In France I finally grew reconciled to him as
a Frenchman; here he is unquestionably an Italian. What next?
Can it be possible that the painters make John the Baptist a
Spaniard in Madrid and an Irishman in Dublin?

Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad (1869), 195.

The documentaries I like best are the ones that have a very
personal point of view, that are subjective—documentaries that
don’t pretend to be objective.

G. Roy Levin, Documentary Explorations (1975), 243.

What is musical humor? How wearying to hear forever about
Haydn’s wit. Play him with a movie about children … and
you’ll hear how witty he is.

Ned Rorem, The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem, 1973-1985 (1987), 3.

The Last Waltz was conceived as The Band’s final statement, a last testament of the group in both live and studio situations. It could have been a sound recording documenting a farewell concert. It could have been a commemorative jam session bringing together musicians who influenced, who were influenced by, and who associated with The Band during a career that began with Ronnie Hawkins. It could have been a collection of interviews or a journal exploring the professional lives of its members, their thoughts on music and the rock world, and their plans for the future.

The Last Waltz, especially in its audio-visual format, was all of these. In musical content, the LP/CD differs from the film. But in 1978 the LP was the only product available for public purchase. The movie could be seen only in theaters. It is only the motion picture, moreover, that comprises performances of old material, performances of new material, collaborations with other musicians, and interviews about the past and the future. The film obviously capitalizes on a visual aspect that is absent from The Last Waltz as sound recording or as soundtrack, absent from The Last Waltz as published journal or as collection of essays.

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intimate Music: A History of the Idea of Chamber Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.