From Walt to Woodstock: How Disney Created the Counterculture

By Douglas Brode | Go to book overview

A RECURRING IM AGE. Numerous Disney films—including Song of the South (1946),
Pollyanna (1960), Follow Me, Boys (1966), and (seen here) So Dear to My Heart (1948)—open
with the image of a vehicle that transports denizens of progressive big cities into tradi-
tionalist small towns; the ensuing give-and-take between those elements allows for a por-
trait of America in transition.


Introduction
Disney’s Version/Disney’s Vision

The World According to Walt

DEEPER MEANING RESIDES IN THE FAIRY TALES TOLD ME IN MY
CHILDHOOD THAN IN THE TRUTH THAT IS TAUGHT BY LIFE.

—Schiller, The Piccolomini, 111.4

THANK YOU FOR INDIVIDUAL PERCEPTION.

—Mort Sahl, 1968

Woodstock; Summer 1969. What follows is a modern urban legend that, if only apocryphal, remains true in spirit. One longhair, passing a toke to a companion, studiously observes the sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll around him. Smiling wryly, he sarcastically comments: “Can you believe these kids were raised on Disney films?” His friend, while attempting to inhale, chokes on his own laughter.

-ix-

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