A Working Life for People with Severe Mental Illness

By Deborah R. Becker; Robert E. Drake | Go to book overview

9
Comprehensive, Work-Based
Assessment
The goal of the assessment phase in the employment process is to understand what the client wants to do and who that person is in terms of strengths, skills, interests, and experiences in order to support him in obtaining a job that is a good fit for him as well as the employer.
Vocational Profile
The employment specialist begins to put together a vocational profile as soon as she receives a referral. She gathers written information from different sources such as the client record and any other documentation and interviews lots of people. The employment specialist meets with the client, other team members and, with the client’s permission, also talks with family members and previous employers. The goal is to gather information that formulates a picture of the person and to promote ideas for a good work situation for the individual. Traditional approaches to assessment and evaluation, such as standardized pencil-and-paper tests, vocational evaluation, or work adjustment activities prior to acquiring a job are deemphasized. Just because a person is able to type and handle phone calls in the office of the community mental health center does not mean she will be able to do the same thing in the office of the United Boxboard Co. 10 miles away.Illustration 12 lists the main ingredients of a vocational profile.
Illustration 12: Vocational Profile

Work Goal
• client’s work goal and life dream for work
• client’s short-term work goal

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