Twentieth Century Poetry: Selves and Situations

By Peter Robinson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Aside from the first, these chapters have appeared in earlier versions, and I gratefully acknowledge the help and permission of their first publishers and editors: ‘Not a Villanelle: Pound’s Psychological Hour’, Shiron [Sendai], 31 (1992); ‘Basil Bunting’s Emigrant Ballads’, in R. Caddel (ed.), Sharp Study and Long Toil: Basil Bunting Special Issue, Durham University Journal supplement (1995); ‘MacNeice, Munich, and Self-Sufficiency’, Shiron [Sendai], 40 (2002); ‘Dependence in the Poetry of W. S. Graham’, Review of English Literature [Kyoto] 60 (1990), and, revised, in H. Jones and R. Pite (eds.), W. S. Graham: Speaking Towards You (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2004); ‘Elizabeth Bishop’s Art’, Perversions [London], 1/3 (1994), and, revised, in S. Sakurai (ed.), The View From Kyoto: Essays on Twentieth-Century Poetry (Kyoto: Rinsen, 1998); ‘“The bliss of what?”: Bishop’s Crusoe’, in L. Kelly (ed.), Poetry and the Sense of Panic: Critical Essays on Elizabeth Bishop and John Ashbery (Amsterdam/Atlanta, Ga: Rodopi, 2000); ‘Allen Curnow Travels’, English 49/193 (2000); ‘Charles Tomlinson in the Golfo dei Poeti’, Review of English Literature [Kyoto], 58 (1989) with passages added from ‘Received Accents’, London Review of Books, 8/3, 20 Feb. 1986; ‘“Absolute circumstance”: Mairi MacInnes’, Cambridge Review, 31/2 (2002), here including passages from a review of Clearances published in The Reader 11 (Sept. 2002), and The Sewanee Review, 61/2 (spring 2003); ‘Tom Raworth and the Pop Art Explosion’ The Gig, 13–14 (2003) (Removed for Further Study: The Poetry of Tom Raworth); ‘Roy Fisher’s Last Things’, in J. Kerrigan and P. Robinson (eds.), The Thing about Roy Fisher: Critical Studies (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2000).

Colleagues, acquaintances, friends, and family have provided longterm support, generous encouragement, and specific help. They know who they are, and I thank them all very warmly.

-vii-

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