Choosing Home: Deciding to Homeschool with Asperger's Syndrome

By Martha Kennedy Hartnett | Go to book overview

What is Asperger’s Syndrome?

Asperger’s Syndrome is a recently defined, neurodevelopmental condition which has sometimes been called “mild or high functioning autism.” It has been included in the DSM IV category of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD), a very broad and somewhat controversial term used to describe individuals who have 1. restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior, 2. defects in communication skills, and 3. significant difficulties in reciprocal, social interactions. Increasingly, PDD is being conceptualized as a continuum running from the most severe form of autism (i.e., Autistic Disorder) through varying degrees of severity which extend to the high functioning edge of the spectrum where AS is located. While individuals with AS retain certain characteristics of more severe autism, AS is characterized by cognitive functioning which falls in the normal or above average range and by generally normal language functioning, although there are a range of subtle, but significant abnormalities of pragmatic language invariably present.

Specifically, some characteristics which result in the social dysfunction of Asperger’s Syndrome may include the following: 1. inability to read non-verbal cues and facial expressions of others, 2. poor eye contact, and 3. awkward

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Choosing Home: Deciding to Homeschool with Asperger's Syndrome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Foreword 9
  • What Is Asperger’s Syndrome? 13
  • Preface 17
  • Chapter One - Struggling 19
  • Chapter Two - The Road Home 34
  • Chapter Three - Moving Forward 42
  • Chapter Four - Socialization 51
  • Chapter Five - Making It All Work 61
  • Chapter Six - Practical Tips 72
  • Chapter Seven - Burnout 85
  • Chapter Eight - Stories and Reflections 92
  • Resources 109
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