Lost for Words: Loss and Bereavement Awareness Training

By John Holland; Ruth Dance et al. | Go to book overview

17
Cultural aspects

Introduction
It is important to be aware that there may be a wide range of beliefs even within families and assumptions should not be made without consultation. The way we perceive death and loss relates not only to ourselves as individuals, but also to our family, community and cultural expectations and experiences. Research indicates that children find active involvement in rites and rituals helpful in their grieving process.
Aim
This is to increase the trainees’ awareness of the cultural basis of belief systems. There is the need to develop sensitive communications with the family to establish their beliefs, customs and wishes.
Method of delivery
Ask the trainees in groups of three or four to discuss their own experiences of involvement in the customs, rites and rituals after a death. Ask the trainees to reflect on what they felt helpful and unhelpful.Next bring the group together and ask the trainees to share their reflections. The trainer should then draw out the similarities and differences of these experiences. Show the trainees Transparency 42, which lists some possible cultural and religious differences.
Materials
OHP
Transparency 42
Handout 11.

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Lost for Words: Loss and Bereavement Awareness Training
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • 1 - Introduction 9
  • 2 - Introducing Trainees to the Package 11
  • 3 - Ice-Breakers 13
  • 4 - Ground Rules 15
  • 5 - Research 17
  • 6 - Loss Experience 25
  • 7 - Changes 33
  • 8 - Case Study 39
  • 9 - Models of Loss 43
  • 10 - Children’s Understanding of Death 57
  • 11 - Euphemisms 63
  • 12 - Death as Taboo 67
  • 13 - Changes in Learning and Behaviour 71
  • 14 - Helping Children 81
  • 15 - Loss in the Curriculum 93
  • 16 - Anticipated and Sudden Death 97
  • 17 - Cultural Aspects 101
  • 18 - Death of a Pupil or Staff Member 105
  • 19 - Loss Response Policies 111
  • 20 - Helping Agencies 115
  • 21 - Resources 119
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