Missing Pieces: My Life as a Child Survivor of the Holocaust

By Olga Barsony-Verrall | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Strength, Courage, and Faith

All life’s loves, small and great,/Are treasured in my love of you,/In
my love of all of you.—
“Harken, O My People!” Sabbath and Festival
Prayer Book

After my mother died, my children missed her terribly. I, too, felt a great emptiness that couldn’t be filled. In addition to the loss, my life became more difficult because I had to take over the entire management of our household – shopping, cooking, and cleaning this bigger house we now had – while I still worked full-time. I have often thought that our lives were much better in the old basement apartment. Now that I had a beautiful house and garden, I had very little time to enjoy it. Still, life has to go on, and we settled back into the everyday events of it – the good, the ordinary, and the bad.

As hard as I tried to be a good mother, I felt something was missing. My children were entering their critical teenage years, and they desperately needed a full-time mother. It wasn’t a question of love; I loved them with all my heart. I was their playmate as long as they needed one and then a confidante and friend later on. I gave them everything even before they asked for it. I dreamed their lives even before they were living them. But was that all that was required to be a good mother? I was raising them from instinct, shaping and shielding their every thought and step lest it lead to pain or disappointment, mapping out for them each perfect step to what I

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Missing Pieces: My Life as a Child Survivor of the Holocaust
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface Reflections xvii
  • Acknowledgements xxi
  • Chapter 1- Birth, Love, and Tradition 1
  • Chapter 2- Playful Years End in Tears 21
  • Chapter 3- Rude Awakening 39
  • Chapter 4- Return to Szarvas 63
  • Chapter 5- Budapest- My Teenage Years 81
  • Chapter 6- Leaving Hungary 97
  • Chapter 7- Coming to Canada 115
  • Chapter 8- The Cantor’s Wife 131
  • Chapter 9- From Winnipeg to Toronto 155
  • Chapter 10- Strength, Courage, and Faith 177
  • Chapter 11- Life Must Go on 201
  • Chapter 12- Return to Hungary 227
  • Legacies Shared Series 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 249

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.