Nationalism and Irony: Burke, Scott, Carlyle

By Yoon Sun Lee | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter One

1. Maria Edgeworth, Castle Rackrent, ed. George Watson (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995) 5.

2. Ibid. 7–8.

3. See Edgeworth’s essay on Irish “bulls” for a discussion of this type of logical contradiction (Richard Lovell Edgeworth and Maria Edgeworth, Essay on Irish Bulls [London: J. Johnson, 1802]). On this essay and its relation to Castle Rackrent and others of Edgeworth’s works, see Catherine Gallagher, Nobody’s Story: The Vanishing Acts of Women Writers in the Marketplace, 1670–1820 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994). See also Mitzi Myers, “Goring John Bull: Maria Edgeworth’s Hibernian High Jinks versus the Imperialist Imaginary,” in Cutting Edges, ed. James Gill (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1995) 367–94; and Michael Neill, “Mantles, Quirks, and Irish Bulls: Ironic Guise and Colonial Subjectivity in Maria Edgeworth’s Castle RackrentReview of English Studies 52, 205 (2001): 76–90.

4. Edgeworth, Castle Rackrent, 7–8. As the following chapters will demonstrate, the metaphor of “habit” becomes crucial in the formulation of British nationalism. An important study, James Chandler’s Wordsworth’s Second Nature (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984), focuses on this trope of habit or second nature. It should be noted here that Spenser here uses “nation” in the older sense of the word as referring not to politically organized, self-governing bodies, but as something closer to ethnic groups. For a brief overview of the history of the word’s different meanings, see Michael Hechter, Containing Nationalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000) 10–11.

5. In his praise of prejudice, Burke writes that Britons refuse “to cast away the coat of prejudice…. Prejudice renders a man’s virtue his habit” (Reflections on the Revolution in France, ed. L. G Mitchell, vol. 8 of The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, ed. Paul Langford [Oxford: Clarendon, 1989] 138). See the useful explanations of “liberal” and “cultural nationalism” in David Aram Kaiser, Romanticism, Aesthetics, and Nationalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999) 18–25.I see cultural nationalism in Kaiser’s sense as somewhat different from, though obviously not entirely separate from, the dis-

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Nationalism and Irony: Burke, Scott, Carlyle
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - Public Irony, Conservatism, and the British Nation 3
  • 2 - Edmund Burke’s Pretexts for Politic Bodies 39
  • 3 - Sir Walter Scott on the Field of Waterloo 74
  • 4 - A Nation’s Fetish- Carlyle and the Work of Literature 105
  • Notes 147
  • Works Consulted 191
  • Index 217
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