Indigenous Peoples, Constitutional States and Treaties or Other Constructive Arrangements between Indigenous Peoples and States

By René Kuppe; Richard Potz | Go to book overview

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ VOICES:
INDIGENOUS PARTICIPATION
IN ILO CONVENTION NO. 169

ILO’s Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention, 1989 (No, 169) entered into force in 1991, one year after its second ratification. We can now1 begin to assess the way in which it is being applied, through the tool of the comments of the ILO’s supervisory bodies and a study of the legislative history of the Convention.

This paper will concentrate on how indigenous and tribal peoples themselves intervened, or are intervening, in three different but related areas: in the adoption of the Convention, in its supervision at the national and international levels, and concretely in its application by ratifying States. The result we will find is that this participation is fully provided for, but does not always happen, and that there is still much to do in this area. Nevertheless, the tools are there and can be developed through a combination of determination by the indigenous peoples and continued openness on the part of the ILO.


I. Listening when adopting Convention No. 169

When the ILO’s Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention, 1989 (No. 169) was being considered for adoption, great priority was given to listening to representatives of the peoples who were to be affected by it. From the point of view of indigenous representatives, it was not the best possible process, but it was what was achievable at the time, and it has not yet been equalled in an international standard-setting context at the same level of discussion.2

1 This article develops a talk given in Seville in September 2001. Some of the references have been updated in July 2003, prior to publication.

2 There has, of course, been a high degree of participation by indigenous representatives in the formulation of the Draft Declaration on Indigenous Rights in the UN, up to the present point when it is being considered in a working group of the Commission on Human Rights, with final responsibility exclusively in the hands of governments in the Commission, ECOSOC and the General Assembly. It remains to be seen whether the UN will be able to allow indigenous representatives full entry into the

-114-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Indigenous Peoples, Constitutional States and Treaties or Other Constructive Arrangements between Indigenous Peoples and States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.