Hollywood, Westerns and the 1930s: The Lost Trail

By Peter Stanfield | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Special acknowledgement is due to Richard Maltby and Ed Buscombe, who helped guide the book from idea to completion. I have learnt much from them.

Particular thanks go to Esther Sonnet, who read and commented on more versions of the manuscript than I care to remember. Thank you also to those friends who have read parts of this book and given the benefit of their advice—a salute, then, to Michael Hammond, Peter Kramer, Lee Grieveson, Steve Neale and Mike Todd. All are herewith granted honorary membership of the Dodge Brothers Motorcycle Club Forever Lasting.

This book first began to take shape following the publication of my ‘Country Music and the 1939 Western: From Hillbillies to Cowboys’ in Ian Cameron and Douglas Pye, The Movie Book of the Western (London: Studio Vista, 1996). I am grateful to the editors and Charles Barr for the opportunity they presented. Parts of Chapters Two and Three were previously published in ‘Dixie Cowboys and Blue Yodels: The Strange History of the Singing Cowboy’ in Edward Buscombe and Roberta Pearson (eds), Back in the Saddle Again (London: BFI, 1998).

Research for this project was supported by two travel grants awarded by the Media Arts Faculty, Southampton Institute.

-ix-

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Hollywood, Westerns and the 1930s: The Lost Trail
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The First Cycle of Sound Westerns 15
  • 2 - Series Westerns, Will Rogers and the Emergence of the Singing Cowboy 1931–1935 56
  • 3 - Series Westerns Masking the Modern 78
  • 4 - Class–A Western Features 1935–1938 117
  • 5 - Democratic Art Westerns 1939–1941 148
  • 6 - Dixie Cowboys Representing the Nation 193
  • Conclusion 225
  • Notes 228
  • Bibliography 248
  • Index 255
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