United States Welfare Policy: A Catholic Response

By Thomas J. Massaro | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Practically every author would prefer to begin a preface like this one by describing how the volume grew out of the author’s hopes or aspirations— fervent desires for a better understanding of a given field of inquiry or for a better future for society or similar optimistic goals.

I cannot, in all honesty, open on such a sanguine note. Rather, this book grows out of my sense of frustration, on two counts.

First, our nation’s social policies fail to reflect the full range of our values as Americans. The rhetoric surrounding the welfare reform of 1996 and the repeated attempts to reauthorize that legislation since 2002 reveal a disturbing gap between the laws we have enacted as a nation and the ethical values we profess as a people. To be sure, the dominant discourse of recent debates over welfare policy did reflect a certain subset of the values Americans tend to hold dear: our legitimate concern about limiting fiscal outlays, encouraging personal responsibility, and enforcing a work ethic. As a result, an open-ended federal entitlement for low-income families was replaced with capped block grants to states. A number of recently enacted social policies also reaffirm our strong work ethic, commitment to honesty, and high regard for stable and independent family life. This is why our newest policies seek to transform welfare into a work-based system of temporary support for low-income families; they reflect an eagerness to separate out those who truly need welfare from those who, with less claim to legitimate need, would take advantage of the system to obtain handouts. But very few features of welfare policy today correspond to another set of our noble national aspirations. These include our collective desires to help the truly needy, to reduce poverty through concerted public action, and to support children who are unfortunate enough to be born into single-parent families whose adult members display significant barriers to employment. Public opinion surveys consistently indicate that the American public thinks our nation is doing too little to help lift poor families above the poverty line. While it is true that an overwhelming majority of Americans repeatedly registers its suspicion of a welfare system that has historically been hampered by a variety of unintended consequences and perverse incentives, we also give ample evidence of understanding the importance of providing the support necessary to make work a realistic route to financial independence,

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
United States Welfare Policy: A Catholic Response
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.